What is a domain name?

A domain name is something we hear mentioned often, but what is it and what does it do?

domain search

What's the difference between a URL and a domain name?

You will be reading this on a computer or mobile, so if you look up to the top of the screen, you'll see the URL in the address bar. URL stands for Uniform Resource Locator, and it's the string of characters that make up the complete address of the webpage you're viewing. A domain name is part of the URL that follows the 'www.' and will be unique for every website. For instance, right now, you'll see our domain - lcn.com – in the address bar.

So, in simple terms, the domain name is what someone will type into the address bar when they want to visit a website.

How did we end up using domain names?

How did we end up using domain names?

Before domain names were around, we used IP addresses to access a website. An IP address (an acronym for Internet Protocol) is a long string of numbers that typically looks like this: 85.233.172.102. Each website was assigned a unique IP address. As the internet grew, it became impossible to remember all these numbers. That’s when domain names were invented - making accessing websites more straightforward and provide a user-friendly way to find what you're after.

Anatomy of a domain name

Domain names are mostly made up of two parts, the TLD (Top-Level Domain) and the SLD (Second-Level Domain).

The TLD

The TLD

The TLD is the last part of the domain name, like .com or .org.

There are more than 1,500 TLDs now, but there was a time when there were only seven! Back in January of 1985, when the world wide web first began, seven TLDs were created and intended for particular entities:

  • .com – for commercial businesses.
  • .org – for non-profit organisations.
  • .net – for e-commerce.
  • .int – for international entities.
  • .edu – for educational institutions.
  • .gov – for government use.
  • .mil – for military use.

Then in June of 1985, the country-code TLDs (also known as ccTLDs) like .co.uk and .fr were created. In recent years, the launch of the New gTLD (generic Top-level Domain) Program created more opportunities, adding over 1,400 new domain extensions, such as .doctor, .garden, and .online.

The SLD

The SLD

The SLD (Second-level Domain) is what makes you unique. It’s the part of the domain name you choose, like the ‘lcn’ in lcn.com. We chose this because it’s the acronym for ‘Low-Cost Names’. So, when you choose your domain name, remember to keep it short, snappy, and most of all, memorable.

Why do you need to register a domain name?

Why do you need to register a domain name?

If you want to have a presence on the internet like a website for your business, a space for your blog, or to use for a personal email, you need to register a domain name. This domain name is then yours to use for as long as you keep renewing it.

What can I use my domain for?

What can I use my domain for?

Domain names are most often used for websites and email. You can build a website yourself or have someone do it for you or even forward it to your Instagram or Facebook profile. Not quite ready for a website? You can use your domain to get a personalised email address – it’s about time you had yourname@yourdomainname.co.uk!

Just want to protect your business name? You can do that, too. When you register a domain name, you’re making sure nobody else can use it. So, you can register the domain name of your not-yet-famous band, the name of an invention or product you’ve created, your children’s names for them to use when they grow up.

Can I get everything I need from LCN.com?

Can I get everything I need from LCN.com?

Wherever you are on your journey towards an online presence, LCN.com has a service that will get you to the next stage. From email solutions and domain names to web hosting, website builders and VPS hosting, we have everything you need for success.

Find your cheap domain name below, or if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact us.